CODAP Standards

Common Core:

Here is the link to the common core standards:
https://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RH/11-12/
These are the Common Core Literacy Standards that I think will be addressed by data studies in the CODAP environment.

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas:
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.11-12.7
Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, as well as in words) in order to address a question or solve a problem.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.11-12.9
Integrate information from diverse sources, both primary and secondary, into a coherent understanding of an idea or event, noting discrepancies among sources.

Science Literacy
Craft and Structure:
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RST.11-12.4
Determine the meaning of symbols, key terms, and other domain-specific words and phrases as they are used in a specific scientific or technical context relevant to grades 11-12 texts and topics.

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas:
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RST.11-12.7
Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., quantitative data, video, multimedia) in order to address a question or solve a problem.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RST.11-12.8
Evaluate the hypotheses, data, analysis, and conclusions in a science or technical text, verifying the data when possible and corroborating or challenging conclusions with other sources of information.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RST.11-12.9
Synthesize information from a range of sources (e.g., texts, experiments, simulations) into a coherent understanding of a process, phenomenon, or concept, resolving conflicting information when possible.

CONSIDER VARIOUS MATHEMATICAL STANDARDS
http://www.corestandards.org/Math/

MINNESOTA STATE STANDARDS (STEM)

STANDARD 9.2.4.1 There are benefits, costs and risks to different means of generating and using energy.
BENCHMARK: 9.2.4.1.2 Use of Energy & Resources Describe the trade-offs involved when technological developments impact the way we use energy, natural resources, or synthetic materials. 
Example Using TerraPop climate data to design a "power grid" for USA.

STANDARD 9.3.4.1
People consider potential benefits, costs and risks to make decisions on how they interact with natural systems
BENCHMARK: 9.3.4.1.1 Natural Hazards
Analyze the benefits, costs, risks and tradeoffs associated with natural hazards, including the selection of land use and engineering mitigation.
For example: Determining land use in floodplains and areas prone to landslides.

STANDARD 9.4.4.2
Personal and community health can be affected by the environment, body functions and human behavior.
BENCHMARK: 9.4.4.2.4 Decisions & Health
Explain how environmental factors and personal decisions, such as water quality, air quality and smoking affect personal and community health.

STANDARD 9.4.4.1
Human activity has consequences on living organisms and ecosystems.
BENCHMARK: 9.4.4.1.2 Human Effects on Ecosystems
Describe the social, economic and ecological risks and benefits of changing a natural ecosystem as a result of human activity. 
Following is an outline of many of the educational standards addressed by this project.

MINNESOTA STATE STANDARDS (Social Studies)

These are the 'Benchmarks.' Standards are one higher on the tree.
http://www.education.state.mn.us/MDE/Welcome/Rule/ActiveRule/SocStudies/...

Minnesota Social Studies Benchmarks, Geography

9.3.1.1.1 Create tables, graphs, charts, diagrams and various kinds of maps including symbol, dot and choropleth maps to depict the geographic implications of current world events or to solve geographic problems. For example: Maps showing changing political boundaries and tables showing the distribution of refugees from areas affected by natural disasters.

9.3.1.2.1 Use geospatial technologies to develop plans for analyzing
and solving local and regional problems that have spatial dimensions.

9.3.1.2.2 Use geospatial technologies to develop plans for analyzing and solving local and regional problems that have spatial dimensions.
For example: Geospatial technology—Geographic Information Systems (GIS), online atlases and databases, Google Earth or similar programs. Regional problems that have spatial dimensions might relate to urban development, environmental concerns, transportation issues, flood control.

9.3.2.3.1 Make inferences and draw conclusions about the physical and human characteristics of places based on a comparison of maps and other geographic representations and geospatial technologies.
For example: Physical characteristics—landforms (Rocky Mountains), ecosystems (forest), bodies of water (Mississippi River, Hudson Bay), vegetation, weather and climate.
Human characteristics—bridges (Golden Gate Bridge), Erie Canal, cities, political boundaries, population distribution, settlement patterns, language, ethnicity, nationality, religious beliefs.

9.3.2.3.1 Make inferences and draw conclusions about the physical and human characteristics of places based on a comparison of maps and other geographic representations and geospatial technologies.
For example: Physical characteristics—landforms (Rocky Mountains), ecosystems (forest), bodies of water (Mississippi River, Hudson Bay), vegetation, weather and climate. Human characteristics—bridges (Golden Gate Bridge), Erie Canal, cities, political boundaries, population distribution, settlement patterns, language, ethnicity, nationality, religious beliefs.

9.3.2.4.1 Apply geographic models to explain the location of economic activities and land use patterns in the United States and the world.

9.3.2.4.2 Identify the primary factors influencing the regional pattern of economic activities in the United States and the world.

9.3.3.5.3 Describe the patterns of human population distribution in the United States and major regions of the world.

9.3.4.9.1 Analyze the interconnectedness of the environment and human activities (including the use of technology), and the impact of one upon the other.

Minnesota US History Benchmarks

US History.

9.4.1.2.1 Pose questions about topics in history; suggest possible answers and write a thesis; locate and organize primary and secondary sources; analyze them for credibility and bias; corroborate information across the sources; use sources to support or refute the thesis; and present supported findings.

OREGON Common Core

9-10.WH.6 Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products, taking advantage of technology’s capacity to link to other information and to display information flexibly and dynamically.

11-12.WH.6 Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information.

11-12.WH.8 Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess strengths and limitations of each source in terms of the specific task, purpose, and audience; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and overreliance on any one source and following a standard format for citation.

11-12.RH.9 Integrate information from diverse sources, both primary and secondary, into a coherent understanding of an idea or event, noting discrepancies among sources.

Relevant parts of math and science standards:
Math: Common Core standards (Grade 8 are listed below)

Investigate patterns of association in bivariate data.

1. Construct and interpret scatter plots for bivariate measurement data to investigate patterns of association between two quantities. Describe patterns such as clustering, outliers, positive or negative association, linear association, and nonlinear association.

2. Know that straight lines are widely used to model relationships between two quantitative variables. For scatter plots that suggest a linear association, informally fit a straight line, and informally assess the model fit by judging the closeness of the data points to the line.

3. Use the equation of a linear model to solve problems in the context of bivariate measurement data, interpreting the slope and intercept. For example, in a linear model for a biology experiment, interpret a slope of 1.5 cm/hr as meaning that an additional hour of sunlight each day is associated with an additional 1.5 cm in mature plant height.

4. Understand that patterns of association can also be seen in bivariate categorical data by displaying frequencies and relative frequencies in a two-way table. Construct and interpret a two-way table summarizing data on two categorical variables collected from the same subjects. Use relative frequencies calculated for rows or columns to describe possible association between the two variables. For example, collect data from students in your class on whether or not they have a curfew on school nights and whether or not they have assigned chores at home. Is there evidence that those who have a curfew also tend to have chores?